Kelly Dilworth

Kelly Dilworth

Kelly Dilworth is a former staff reporter at CreditCards.com. She began her career in journalism at The Atlantic in 2007, then detoured into nonfiction book publishing for several years. She returned to journalism in 2010 and since then has written about everything from 20-somethings with Herculean credit scores to the Federal Reserve's monetary policy decisions. Kelly holds a degree in liberal arts from Sarah Lawrence College and lives in Austin, TX. ...

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Refinancing your student loan could potentially save you a bundle on interest. But lenders' requirements are so stringent that most borrowers are unlikely to qualify for the best deals.
If Apple Pay and similar mobile payment systems catch on with enough people, it will help undermine the data broker industry, which has been collecting and selling people's purchase histories for years. It may also help attract more privacy and security-conscious cardholders to mobile payments, which have struggled to gain traction with consumers.
U.S. households are more bullish about their personal finances than they've been since 2009, according to a survey released Sept. 29 by Absolute Strategy Research. But a striking number of Americans are still skeptical that the "American Dream" remains intact and that the next generation will be substantially better off.
A substantial number of young people are bucking tradition and putting off marriage until they feel more financially secure, according to a new study from the Pew Research Center.
If you're struggling to build or rebuild your credit, you may want to look into obtaining a small dollar loan from a nonprofit lender.
More than five years have passed since the Great Recession formally ended in June 2009. But for many Generation Xers, it's still not over.
When a family member told me they're skipping college in order to avoid the extra debt, I couldn't bring myself to tell them that they're making a huge mistake. A lifetime of low earnings makes it tough to get by. But so does crushing debt. Here's what the numbers from new studies say.
Soon after my husband and I found out we were expecting, I drew up a list of "must-have" baby items -- ranging from a car seat and stroller to baby sunscreen. At the time, I thought I was being selective. But when I added everything up, I was shocked: It would cost us nearly $2,000 to purchase the items on my list -- and I hadn't even included diapers and baby clothes, apart from a few basics.
I'm turning 30 in a few weeks and, according to some personal finance experts, I've only completed a fraction of the financial moves I'm supposed to have made by now.
Lenders, potential employers or landlords aren't the only one clamoring for access to your personal credit history. Some health care providers use it to decide whether or not patients can afford costly medical treatment. And even the federal health insurance marketplace, HealthCare.gov, uses it to verify applicants' identities.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is taking a fresh look at costly overdraft fees and is considering imposing new rules on the controversial practice.
If you're struggling to curb your urge to splurge, you may want to keep better track of your recent purchases. A forthcoming study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that impulsive spenders tend to conveniently 'forget' just how much they spent the last time they indulged.
If you're trying to decide whether or not to buy something, you could have a harder time passing it up if it reminds you of a happy moment from your past. According to a new study forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Research, feeling nostalgic may cause some people to spend more than they would otherwise.
In many states across the country, infant child care is more expensive than a year of tuition at a four-year public university. But unlike college students, most parents don't have access to low-interest loans for day care.
If you're already carrying a hefty amount of student loan, mortgage or credit card debt, you may have a tough time convincing your lender you deserve another loan. A new survey from the Professional Risk Managers International Association and FICO found that the majority of bank risk professionals cite high debt-to-income ratios (which compare how much debt you owe to how much money you take in) as their biggest source of worry when deciding whether to approve a new loan.
New research suggests that credit card minimum payment warnings could be prompting some consumers to pay less than they would otherwise.
College debt weighs so heavily on the millennial generation that a college-educated 30-year old is now less likely to own a home than a 30-year-old with no student debt. That was part of the testimony at a U.S. Senate hearing this week, aptly titled "Dreams Deferred."
The next time you get the urge to overspend, you may want to take a moment to count your current blessings. A new study published this month in the journal "Psychological Science" found that cultivating a sense of gratitude not only helps boost your overall well-being; it may also help curb your urge to splurge.
According to a new Wells Fargo survey, 80 percent of millennials say the Great Recession taught them the value of saving for a rainy day. But nearly half of the millennials surveyed said they aren't saving anything for retirement.
Once again, U.S. colleges and universities are taking heat from federal lawmakers for peddling hazardous plastic on campus. But this time, lawmakers are zeroing in on campus-issued debit cards, rather than credit cards.
If you're down to your last dollar, you may want to save your money rather than spend it. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, the less cash you have on hand, the more likely you are to regret your purchase, regardless of what you bought.
Creditors may not be able to see on your traditional credit report what you did more than 10 years ago. But there's nothing stopping them from looking you up online and searching the public records information that Google makes so easily available.
If you're thinking about skipping college in order to avoid becoming saddled with too much debt, you may want to think twice about your decision. College graduates not only earn substantially more over the course of their lifetimes. They're also much less likely to become mired in high-interest credit card debt.
In an effort to combat identity theft, U.S. lawmakers have restricted access to the Social Security Administration's infamous Death Master File.
If you're a recent grad with more debt than you can manage, you may be eligible for federal loan assistance that caps your monthly payments based on how much you take in. But, one more time, do your homework. New research makes a persuasive argument that choosing between repayment plans, like choosing between colleges, can have a significant and long-lasting impact on graduates' financial lives.
If it's been a while since you applied for your last credit card, you could be in for a shock the next time you start comparing APRs. Average rates on new card offers have ballooned in recent years -- rising from an average of 11.54 percent in 2008 to just over 14.98 percent in 2013. And, chances are, they're just going to keep going up.
If you're in the market for a new checking account, you should have an easier time comparing fees. A new study from the Pew Charitable Trust found that a growing number of banks are simplifying their account disclosures -- making it easier for consumers to quickly scan a list of fees. However, once you settle on a new account, watch out for fee gouging. The same study also found that a large number of banks are still nickel-and-diming their customers.
It's not always easy to get stubborn credit report errors permanently cleared from a report. But if a group of Democratic senators get their way, consumers will one day have a much easier time forcing legitimate errors off their reports.
Usually when we talk about student debt, we're referring to the loans undergraduates take on to finance their educations. But a new report from the New America Foundation suggests that graduate school students may be having an even tougher time affording their degrees.
When strapped for cash and hit with an unexpected bill, some may feel as if they have no other choice but to turn to a payday lender. But new research from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows that taking out one of these short-term loans could just sink you deeper into debt.

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