Matt Schulz

Matt Schulz is senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com. He is also the founder of TalkingInClass.org, a website devoted to improving childhood financial literacy by mobilizing money-smart grown-ups to share their knowledge in America’s classrooms.

With more than a decade of experience in personal finance, Schulz is regularly quoted by news outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and The New York Times. He has also appeared on national news shows such as the CBS Evening News, NBC’s Today Show, CNBC’s Power Lunch and Fox Business’ Mornings With Maria as well on hundreds of local TV and radio stations throughout the nation.

He is also a frequent speaker at conferences such as Money 2020, FINCON and the Digital Money Forum at CES. He is a graduate of the University of Texas and lives in Austin with his amazing wife and awesome little boy.

Posts by Matt Schulz

Living with credit

The 2 biggest causes of runaway credit card debt

Credit card debt is now the most widely held type of debt in the United States, according to Federal Reserve data released on Wednesday. Forty-four percent of Americans held credit card debt in 2016, the Fed said in its recently…
Read More

Living with credit, Research, regulation, industry reports

Bad credit? It’s getting tougher to get a card

The freewheeling, darn-near-everyone-who-wants-a-card-gets-a-card times that the credit card business has experienced for the past few years might finally be coming to an end, according to Federal Reserve data released on Monday. The Fed’s Quarterly Senior Loan Officer Survey showed that…
Read More

New products, Rewards, Shopping

Amazon Prime Reload: No-brainer or no, thank you?

Amazon is trying to bring debit card rewards back, but it may not be the no-brainer it sounds like for consumers. The online retail behemoth recently announced its new Prime Reload program, which effectively allows Amazon Prime members to get…
Read More

Fine print, Living with credit, Protecting yourself, Research, regulation, industry reports

Card APRs will rise quickly after Fed rate hike

How quickly will they hit you? Once the Fed acts, your card agreement spells it out, and there are variations between banks. Some will act superfast, others will grant customers a brief reprieve.
Read More