Tag Archives: privacy

MasterCard wants to know where you are

Kelly Dilworth

The global payments firm MasterCard says that if it knows where you are, it can help protect you from data theft — and send you targeted coupons.
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Data broker’s dealings with ID thief expose lax protections

Fred Williams

It was bad enough when hackers breached data brokers’ digital warehouses with ID theft in mind. Now a data broker scandal shows how weak the protections are for consumers’ identifying details.
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Web service protects shoppers’ card details (for a price)

Kelly Dilworth

The creators of the new anti-tracking service “Mask Me” couldn’t have picked a more prescient time to launch their newest venture. On July 24, the Boston-based online privacy firm Abine sent out a press release announcing the new service, which allows users to anonymously shop and surf the Web without disclosing credit card details or other personal information (such as email addresses or phone numbers). The following week, the British newspaper The Guardian disclosed fresh details about the National Security Agency’s now infamous online tracking capabilities.
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Health officials track food illnesses via warehouse club purchases

Jay MacDonald

Local, state and federal health officials increasingly tap the stored purchase data of warehouse and supermarket membership accounts to track down outbreaks of food-borne illnesses. One day, your Costco, Sam’s Club, Kroger or Publix card, with its detailed description of exactly who bought what when and where, could give health officials just the head start they need to contain a fast-moving epidemic and save lives … or have enough data to invade your food-related privacy.
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When it comes to your personal and financial details, there’s no hiding now

Kelly Dilworth

If you value your privacy, the past several years have been rough.

Advertisers are trying to make money off you by following your activities on the Web. Credit card issuers are tracking what you buy — not just for anti-fraud purposes. And dozens of consumer reporting companies are collecting and selling so much personal and financial information about you that if you pulled all that data together in one place, you’d essentially create a revealing biography of who you are — and how you choose to live.

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